Monday, September 30, 2013

Adding Musicality to Our Writing

Agenda:
-Bell Work (capricious)
-Song presentations
-Rhyme/musicality worksheet

Homework:
-Finish worksheet

Name:
Ms. Hoffmann
Creative Writing
9/30/13
Adding Musicality to Our Writing

Follow the directions for each number to practice crafting poetic lines that contain the more melodious devices we have been studying in class.  Feel free to use the other works and songs that we have been looking to as a guide; however, be sure that all work submitted here is your own.

1. Write at least two lines of poetry that contain an end rhyme.
Example--I do not wish to go,
for I surely will meet my foe.
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2. Write at least two lines of poetry that contain perfect rhymes at the end of each line.  You may already have written one example of such for number 1.  If this is the case, you need to write another example here.  (Sorry, white space does not count!)
Example--Although the affair was likely to be stuffy,
I made certain to wear a gown most fluffly.
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3. Write two lines of poetry that end with slant rhymes rather than perfect rhymes.  Remember that in the case of slant rhymes, vowel sounds may be similar or even significantly dissimilar.  Additionally, consonant sounds would be similar rather than identical.
Example--Though I read the letter times upward of eleven,
My mind yearned for even more repetition.
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4. Write two lines of poetry that end with a sight rhyme.  Remember that sight rhymes are neither perfect rhymes nor slant rhymes.  Sight rhymes only look as though they should rhyme.
Example--With slow motions it did move
As though with the careful patience of a dove.
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5. Now that you have written a number of sample lines containing various types of end rhyme, it is time for you to shift the placement of the rhyme a little.  Write two consecutive lines of verse that contain internal rhyme but no end rhyme.
Example--To town I went with the goal
In mind of a gown to purchase.
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6.  Let’s step away from rhyme for a minute and think about the other ways we can add musicality to a piece of writing.  First, let’s consider consonance, the recurrence of consonant sounds, particularly at the end of stressed syllables. (Do not use alliteration yet.)
Example--Little will could not fill the pail.  (Look at all of those l sounds repeated!)
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7. Now, let’s try that specific type of consonance, alliteration, the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words in close proximity.
Example--Peter piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
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8. Assonance, the repetition of vowel sounds within words in close proximity, is the last poetic device we are going to try.  Once again, write a couple of lines that contain an example of this device.
Example-- “Coaches like loaves of breaded powdered with snow”--White

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