Monday, September 30, 2013

Adding Musicality to Our Writing

Agenda:
-Bell Work (capricious)
-Song presentations
-Rhyme/musicality worksheet

Homework:
-Finish worksheet

Name:
Ms. Hoffmann
Creative Writing
9/30/13
Adding Musicality to Our Writing

Follow the directions for each number to practice crafting poetic lines that contain the more melodious devices we have been studying in class.  Feel free to use the other works and songs that we have been looking to as a guide; however, be sure that all work submitted here is your own.

1. Write at least two lines of poetry that contain an end rhyme.
Example--I do not wish to go,
for I surely will meet my foe.
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2. Write at least two lines of poetry that contain perfect rhymes at the end of each line.  You may already have written one example of such for number 1.  If this is the case, you need to write another example here.  (Sorry, white space does not count!)
Example--Although the affair was likely to be stuffy,
I made certain to wear a gown most fluffly.
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3. Write two lines of poetry that end with slant rhymes rather than perfect rhymes.  Remember that in the case of slant rhymes, vowel sounds may be similar or even significantly dissimilar.  Additionally, consonant sounds would be similar rather than identical.
Example--Though I read the letter times upward of eleven,
My mind yearned for even more repetition.
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4. Write two lines of poetry that end with a sight rhyme.  Remember that sight rhymes are neither perfect rhymes nor slant rhymes.  Sight rhymes only look as though they should rhyme.
Example--With slow motions it did move
As though with the careful patience of a dove.
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5. Now that you have written a number of sample lines containing various types of end rhyme, it is time for you to shift the placement of the rhyme a little.  Write two consecutive lines of verse that contain internal rhyme but no end rhyme.
Example--To town I went with the goal
In mind of a gown to purchase.
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6.  Let’s step away from rhyme for a minute and think about the other ways we can add musicality to a piece of writing.  First, let’s consider consonance, the recurrence of consonant sounds, particularly at the end of stressed syllables. (Do not use alliteration yet.)
Example--Little will could not fill the pail.  (Look at all of those l sounds repeated!)
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7. Now, let’s try that specific type of consonance, alliteration, the repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words in close proximity.
Example--Peter piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
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8. Assonance, the repetition of vowel sounds within words in close proximity, is the last poetic device we are going to try.  Once again, write a couple of lines that contain an example of this device.
Example-- “Coaches like loaves of breaded powdered with snow”--White

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Friday, September 27, 2013

Presentation Day II

Agenda:
-Bell Work
-Vocab Quiz
-Continue with the "Music of Poetry" presentations

Homework:
-None.  If you did not present today, be prepared to give your presentation on Monday.

Thursday, September 26, 2013

The Music in Poetry

Agenda:
-Bell Work
-Presentations

Homework:
-Study vocab
-Be prepared to present tomorrow if you did not today

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Song Day II

Agenda:
-Post Lyrics if you haven't
-Google Doc answering the journal question
-Be ready to present your findings and how these findings support the deeper meaning of your chosen song tomorrow

Homework:
-Whatever you need to finish what you did not in class for tomorrow

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Song Quest: Music as Poetry Assignment Part I

Music as Poetry Assignment

In extending our examination of how music is like poetry, we will be looking at how songs make use of poetic devices.  In order to start this process, there are some steps that you need to complete in class today.

  1. Choose a song that you like.  (It also should be a song that you have access to via YouTube or mp3 file to share.)
  2. Now, make sure that song is school-appropriate.  You may have to find the "clean" version of a song, or you may have to go looking for another one all together.  Run your choice by me if you are uncertain of what school-appropriate means.  Post these lyrics in a reply to this blog post.
  3. Ask yourself if your chosen song has depth to it.  It will need to have some in order to do the second portion of this process, which we will complete in class later on this week.  
  4. Start a set of notes about the song.  
    1. How does this song make creative use of poetic lines?  (Look back to your notes and think back to your most recent poetry assignment--line length, white space, end stop, enjambment, etc.)
    2. How does this song make use of poetic musicality (rhyme, alliteration, assonance, ...maybe even meter)?
    3. **It is not enough to list that something exists in your song.  I expect you to quote specific lines and show that you know what we have been talking about through a sentence or two addressing each quote.**  Go back to questions 1 & 2 and add example lines now..


Friday, September 20, 2013

Catch-all Day

Agenda:
-Vocab Quiz
-Bell Work (assail)
-Journal Response on completed poem
-Meter Worksheet

Homework:
-Have a good weekend!

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Understanding Check: Meter

*Review homework scansion of Gail White's "My Personal Recollections of Not Being Asked to the Prom"

  • Was your analysis correct?

  • Go through and answer all 10 questions until you get them correct
  • Take notes as you go explaining why the chosen answer is correct in terms of both the specific foot that is used as well as the length of the line
  • Workshop your poems if you find yourself finished early

*Peer Review Questions
  • What is happening in the poem?  What seems to be its meaning?
  • What stands out to you as a reader?  Why does this portion of the poem stand out?
  • Is there any suspense in the piece?  Where and why?
  • Does the poem meet all of the criteria in the final piece checklist?
  • What is one suggestion you have for revisions?
  • What is one aspect of the piece that you really like?

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Mon & Tues--Line Review and the Meter of Poetry

Monday's Agenda:
-Bell Work
-Review homework planning sheet
-Workshop time for the poem

Homework:
-Continue to work on translating your prose into a meaningful poem, due Friday


Tuesday's Agenda:
-Bell Work
-Meter and Rhythm Power point
-A closer look at iambic pentameter

Homework:
-Determine the meter of White's poem for tomorrow
-Bring in what you have finished so far of your poem

Friday, September 13, 2013

The Poetic Line Creation

Agenda:
-Vocab
-Vocab Quiz
-Poetic Line Review
-Poetic Line Planning Sheet

Homework:
-Finish your planning sheet for Monday
-Finish your free write if you have not (You should have done this already!  It is too early for senioritis to kick in.)

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Prose to Poetry

Agenda:
-Bell Work (oligarchy)
-Review of some poetry concepts
-Journal I: Using visual imagery, write a prose piece describing a disgusting, repulsive place.
-Journal II: Now add in something that makes this abysmal place beautiful in some way.


Homework:
-Finish any parts of your free writes that you have yet to complete
-Think about how you might use from what we learned about the structure of poetic lines to add meaning to your piece

The Poetic Line II

Agenda:
-Bell Work
-Review Ruth Stone poem and yesterday's concepts
-Finish power point
-Individual evaluation of Williams Carlos Williams and ee cummings arrangement of poetic lines

Homework:
-Complete individual evaluations
-Come to class tomorrow prepared to write your own poems!

Monday, September 9, 2013

The Poetic Line

Agenda:
-Notes on the Poetic Line
-Analysis + chart of the poetic line in selected poems

Homework:
-Complete a row of the chart for Ruth Stone's poem, "Winter"
-Be prepared to finish up notes in class tomorrow and to analyze more pieces on your own

Friday, September 6, 2013

What is Poetry? + Formal Definitions

Agenda:
-Vocab Quiz
-Bell Work (postponed til Monday)
-What to hand in for your assignment
-Finish artifact protocol
-Formal Definitions of Poetry

Homework:
-None

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Intro to Poetry: Artifact Box

Agenda:
-What is Poetry? Journal
-Artifact Box: Reading and responding to a selection of poetry


Homework:
-Portfolio Piece due tomorrow.  You will need to hand in:

  • The piece you found for homework for the first day of school
  • Your in-class writings on the piece
  • Your final draft of your 1-page emulation with the label of what you emulated and where
-Also bring all materials from today's class


Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Peer Review Day

Agenda (Short day, class meetings)
*Bell Work: Brown study
*Peer Review
*Workshop and Revision Time


Homework
*Be prepared to hand in first composition piece on Friday!

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Emulation

Agenda:
-Bell Work: Abjure
-Emulation: What it is and what it is not
-How do we do it?-->Choose a literary device to use in your own work, choose a topic to write about, write!


Homework

  • Final Piece:

    • At least 1 full page in length
    • Emulates an aspect of the original writing but does not plagiarize the piece
      (Please label what you are trying to do)
    • Typed, 12 pt font, Times New Roman, 1 inch margins (MLA)
    • Handed in with chosen model and freewrite from second day of class

    • Polished Version: Due Friday